Frequently Asked Questions

I want to buy some art – where do I start?

I’d suggest looking through my print gallery to see what captures your attention. The next step would be to think about how much you would like to invest in a work. An original painting will cost more than a limited edition print – there being of course only one original – however a print on a wall can give a very similar effect to the original painting and will cost you a lot less.  Once you’ve made this decision simply measure the space within the wall you would like to fill, to ascertain what size print or original painting will work for you. Having ascertained the above simply click – add to cart – for the print you want, or contact me or the gallery (where ever the painting is) to find out more about an original painting you’re interested in.

Why would I invest in a limited-edition print?

I title, number, and sign every print by hand – thereby personalising a printed artwork – creating the potential for the print to increase in value over the years corresponding with my profile as an artist.

 

Purchasing & Shipping

Where do you ship to and how much does it cost?

I ship worldwide to Italy, Australia, Canada, Fiji, France, Germany, Ireland, Spain, United Kingdom and the United States. In New Zealand delivery is free. If you live some where else please contact me.

How are prints packaged for delivery?

Any larger print you buy will be delivered to you unframed and rolled up in a protective tube. A small paper print ie “Beach Star” will be packaged flat (unframed) between thick layers of card board.

 

About the Prints

Are the prints good quality?

Absolutely! My limited edition Giclée art prints (printed locally in Auckland, New Zealand) achieve superb colour and archival quality with pigment-based inks on acid-free 308gsm Hahnemuhle Rag paper or 100% acid-free cotton canvas. This high quality is made possible by an increase in the density of the pigments that are used which give them a superior light resistance and striking resemblance to the original work.  Each print - to my eye - is remarkably close to the original painting, especially with canvas prints because there is no need for framed glass over the image. The best fine art prints in major museums and art galleries around the world are now digitally produced. Digital printers can now produce work of the highest standard with an estimated light-fastness of 60-100 years plus.

Is the size of a print on your website the size of the actual print image?

When measurements are given in the options drop down box for a specific print - the dimensions are of the actual image of that particular print (and exclude the white border).  Some of my prints are shown in various interior settings - the size of the artwork on the wall in these photos may differ from the size of prints available for sale.

Do I need to be careful with my print when it’s delivered?

Yes you do. Canvas prints are a little more forgiving than paper prints. However any handling of either paper or canvas prints is best left to a professional framer using gloves. This is especially the case when removing the curl of a paper print in preparation for framing. Be careful not to get dust on the print, though if this does happen I would suggest removal with a very soft clean brush, as wiping the surface of a print with your hand or a cloth may scratch the print. Avoid getting any moisture on your print either from your hands or other sources as any moisture will damage the ink.

Will sunlight fade the colour of my print?

Yes, don’t hang a print in direct sunlight. My prints are estimated to show no fading noticeable to the human eye for 60 years plus – if framed in standard glass and displayed in standard lighting conditions. This above estimate for one of my prints preserving its colour is significantly extended if UV museum glass is used.

Is framing included in the price of your prints?

No. Any prints you buy from my website are unframed. I will courier them to you rolled in a tube (or packaged flat if a small print) and you can choose the framing you like.

What do you suggest with framing?

You will need to cover any paper print with glass as any moisture on the print will damage it – standard, non-reflective or museum UV protective glass are all fine. Canvas prints do not need to be covered in glass as each canvas print is sprayed with a clear protective coating. I would recommend surrounding each paper print with a cardboard mat between 50-140mm depending on the size of the actual print and your preference. Any colour mat board which works with the print can be used. But if you just can’t decide - a white mat board will work with all my prints. Once a canvas print is stretched over a frame, and you have selected a suitable mat board for a paper print, the type of frame can be whatever you choose.

How much does is cost to frame a print?

Cost varies on the size of the print, the size of the mat board, the moulding (aka the actual frame round the very outside of the finished framed work), type of glass: standard, non-reflective or museum UV protective glass, and if it’s a canvas print if you want to put a frame around the canvas once the artwork is stretched over a frame. Framing starts for as little as $130 for small prints – for example “Beach Star”.

Why have you only got a few very large print options?

I have selected a few of my paintings to reproduce as prints on very large canvases due to the striking visual effect of the original large painting. These artworks, are perfect to fill large walls for a small investment, and make an impressive statement for your beautiful home, corporate environment or business foyer. These significant canvases when stretched, create a window into a beautiful New Zealand view, and fill any space with the warm ambiance of summer sun and holiday memories.

What framers do you recommend?

Homestead Picture Framers - 102 Railside Avenue, Henderson, Waitakere, Auckland ph (09) 838 6920 or Factory Frames - 22 Apollo Drive, Mairangi Bay, Auckland ph 0800 488 488.

 

About Me

How did you get to be an Artist?

This is a big question! As a child I always thought that I would like to be an artist when I grew up, and my earliest memories are of spending a lot of time drawing and painting. My passion for re-creating whatever subject matter I love into works of pencil or paint continued into adulthood and I began exhibiting and selling my work in 1995. Painting, exhibiting and selling my work just grew from that point onwards.

Do you get tired of painting?

I only get tired of painting if I try to make myself paint when I don’t feel like it, and at these times I need to remind myself to stop, catch up with friends or simply go and get some exercise. What always brings me back to painting though is the inspiration I get from the beauty I see - like when I visit places like the Tutukaka coast line. I find myself looking at the gorgeous view in front of me, envision it on canvas and then I can’t wait to get home to start painting. My painting process is always a work in progress too, so for me painting never becomes dull. I can see how my work has evolved in a more obvious way from water colour works to acrylic on canvas 20 years ago, along with more subtle changes over the years such as: a more muted colour palette, an increasing level of abstraction, and overall more of a sensitivity regarding tonal qualities – all of which I find exciting.

Do you sit outside and paint what is in front of you?

I don’t paint outside, mainly due to the size of my canvases and time. My recent paintings have been around 1.5 metres long which of course make transportation and working on site a bit of an issue. Plus my style of painting is very fine and detailed which means it takes me up to 250 hours or more to complete a work.

Can you tell me a bit about your painting process?

I’m generally inspired by a beautiful natural environment, typically incorporating the sea, which prompts me to re-create what I’m looking at and love, as a painting. I draw an outline on a blank canvas from a photo which for me represents a breathtaking, in-the-moment experience of feeling as one with whatever I was looking at, and am increasingly able to distract my conscious mind by listening to music, movies, documentaries and audio books – and let my body paint my painting. I think this state is akin to what a runner might call being in the “zone” – a creative state which I find a very enjoyable experience.

Jane Puckey

+64 27 651 6605
jane@janepuckey.com


 

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